O Viagra
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O citrato de viagra cialis online pharmacy pharmacy é o componente ativo do Viagra®, que é a primeira droga oral lançada contra a disfunção erétil. É designado como citrato de 1-[[3-(6,7-diidro-1-metil-7-oxo-3-propil-1H-pirazol-[4,3-d]pirimidin-5-il)-4-etóxifenil]sulfonil,]-4-metilpiperazina. Ele inibe a enzima fosfodiesterase tipo 5(PDES). O Viagra® é um dos medicamentos mais usados contra a disfunção erétil. (WELNERT; PEZZA; PEZZA, 2007). Além da disfunção erétil o citrato de sildenafil, pesquisa-se seu potencial no tratamento da hipertensão pulmonar, pois ele promove a vasodilatação pulmonar (BENTLIN, et al. 2005).

“Esse medicamento é disponível para uso via oral, tendo boa absorção no trato gastrointestinal e inicio de ação de 15 minutos após administração. Apresenta meia vida de 4 horas, e a eliminação é hepática.” (BENTLIN, et al. 2005). Tem como efeitos colaterais: “cefaléia, rubor, tontura, dispepsia, congestão nasal e alterações visuais” (BENTLIN, et al. 2005).

O Viagra® não é usado apenas para homens, nos quais promove a ereção, nas mulheres também são questionados seus efeitos; vários estudos apontam que ele estimula a circulação ampliando a lubrificação vaginal e excitação do clitóris, facilitando o orgasmo (BRIGEIRO; MAKSUD, 2009). Além disso, há relatos de uso do sidenafil em crianças com menos de quatro anos para a hipertensão primária (BENTLIN, et al. 2005).

O Viagra® dá valor ao sexo para ajudar a relações conjugais, mesmo quando o este não é mais o foco principal (BRIGUEIRO; MAKSUD, 2009).


Response to Article from Men's Health
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The following is my response to an article published in the men's health section and posted on the Fox News website. Please read and respond. The article is inaccurate and unfair.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2011/01/14/trusted-sources-protein/?test=faces#5_2,4_0_cf67f9da_{%22method%22:%22cookieFailure%22,%22params%22:[],%22jsonrpc%22:%222.0%22}

I am a fifth generation rancher in the Flinthills of Kansas and I am also one of the small producers that the article speaks of. However, I feel the need to stand up and say that the article is both misleading and inaccurate and the facts must be set straight. The meat in the grocer case is both safe and nutritious. Most importantly it is affordably priced for all consumers.

I direct market a significant number of the beef cattle I produce locally. The beef I market is a premium product priced at a premium level. My customers are middle to upper class and can afford my product. However, many cannot and that is why we need larger farms producing a more affordable product.

The safety of meat is also questioned in this article. That is absolutely false. E-coli can simply be avoided through proper handling and cooking of meat. Consumers who properly handle meat making sure to clean utensils after each step in the cooking process and who cook their meat to the proper internal temperature are protected from e-coli. The truth is that e-coli were much more prevalent 80 years ago when production practices were more closely aligned to the ones supported by the article.

The truth of the matter is that there is a need both for locally raised, premium foods and for the products produced on a larger scale for distribution in larger stores. Small farms simply cannot produce enough food for the ever growing, ever more urban population.

We are incredibly blessed in this nation to have a safe and abundant food supply. Farmers and ranchers produce more food , cheaper, with fewer inputs in a more environmentally friendly manner, each year. The need for nutrition in this country has led to the creation of the greatest most efficient agriculture system in the entire world. All I ask is that the readers of this article take the time to get to know the great online pharmacy and women who produce the food and fiber we all need. Do that and they will have a greater appreciation and trust in our shared food supply


A doctor’s duty
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Huma Wasim Akram, Imanae Malik and Faiz Muhammad Khan. The tragic and untimely death of each has sparked a vehement debate on the state of the medical profession in Pakistan.
While the National Assembly and the courts try to ascertain the cause of each death and the media clamours for accountability of doctors, the toll of accidents and deaths at the hands of doctors continues to rise throughout Pakistan.
Hearing these reports the average Pakistani planning to visit a viagra fears for his life, wondering perhaps whether the cialis will cure him or maim him or kill him. It is fair to ask, if this person is irrational and expects too much, and the only way to answer this question is to examine the nature of the duty a doctor owes to his patients and to consider means through which the law can compel him to perform it.
The first and most succinct formulation of the duty owed by a doctor to his patients is contained in the Hippocratic Oath written in Greece sometime in the fifth century BC by Hippocrates, the man recognised as the father of western medicine: “I will prescribe regimens for the good of my patients according to my ability and my judgment and never do harm to anyone.” Although the language of the oath has evolved through the ages, its essence remains the same and continues to guide modern medical ethics throughout the world.
This duty has been recognised by law as a doctor’s (and other medical practitioners’) ‘duty to take care’ and applies irrespective of whether he has signed a contract of service with the patient, incorporating or excluding such duty.
The underlying assumption is that a person who offers medical advice and treatment implicitly states that he has the skill and knowledge to do so, to decide whether or not to take the case, to determine the nature of the treatment and to administer the treatment. If, therefore, in his treatment, a doctor deviates from accepted standards of practice and causes injury to or death of a patient he is guilty of professional negligence and liable to pay damages to the patient or his heirs.
The law on medical negligence has developed considerably in the West where doctors maintain professional liability insurance to offset the risk of claims brought against them for professional negligence. Across the border, Indian doctors may also be held liable under consumer protection laws (unless they have provided the service free of charge), or under the general civil and criminal law. In all instances, however, a doctor can only be held liable if the person suing him succeeds in proving — or the situation is so clear that it speaks for itself — that the doctor is guilty of a failure that no doctor with ordinary skills would be guilty of if acting with reasonable care. Doctors cannot, nor are they expected to, guarantee either their skill or the outcome of the treatment. All they can do is act with reasonable care.
In Pakistan, the law relating to medical negligence is at a nascent stage and the concept of professional insurance for doctors almost non-existent. The few cases decided by the high courts endorse the duty owed by a doctor to his patient. Of particular interest is Justice Mushir Alam’s judgment in the case of Mrs Rahat Ali v. Dr Saeeda Rehman in which he states, “a … doctor is to take all due care, take necessary precaution, give proper attention while extending advice, treatment or when operating upon”.
He goes on to state, however, that “[in the case of doctors] general presumption is attracted that they have performed their duties to the best of their abilities and with due care and caution [unless] it is established through cogent evidence that [they]…failed to take necessary precaution, due care and attention or acted carelessly and negligently”.
A judicial opinion such as Justice Mushir Alam’s offers some hope to the patient and his heirs: if a person suffers at the hands of a doctor, or dies due to the treatment, he or his heirs may sue the doctor and claim damages either from the doctor or from the hospital or clinic that employs him. However, the rigours of litigation are such that only educated and reasonably affluent urban dwellers are likely to venture into it whereas others would find themselves at the mercy of doctors and, worse still, of quacks masquerading as doctors.
One solution is to enable persons to seek redress through consumer courts, as is being done India. These courts are located in smaller districts and a person may appear before them without a lawyer. Here too, however, he would still need to establish that the injury or death was a result of an act or omission of the doctor. It is unlikely that a layperson would be sufficiently savvy or have access to necessary materials, to make the legal connection between the outcome, of which he complains, and the treatment he was given.
In any event, redress through the courts is a remedy after the fact and offers little comfort to a person facing the prospect of losing a limb or his life. Therefore, more important than allowing greater access to courts and enhancing the penalties for negligence is to take steps to prevent negligence from occurring in the first place.
Perhaps this calls for reform of the Pakistan Medical & Dental Council Ordinance 1962 to ensure that the council is a lean, efficient and independent body run by medical practitioners for the benefit of the profession and the public and which is diligent in improving the standard of medical education, training and licensing throughout Pakistan. At the very least the power of the council to restore the licence of a medical practitioner once it has been revoked needs to be carefully reviewed to eliminate any potential of abuse.
While recognising not only that doctors owe a fundamental duty of care to their patients but also that there is need to reform the present legal framework of the profession, it is essential to ensure that the focus of all reform is on distinguishing those doctors that act in good faith and to the best of their ability from those that are negligent, rash or reckless and on punishing only the latter with appropriate and objective severity. A solution lacking this balance will drive out any good doctors that may still remain in the country and leave the field open to their less vigilant peers to play with the lives of patients according to their whims.

Pain specialist establishes practice with St. Francis spine group
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INDIANAPOLIS – Robert I. Prince, M.D., has joined the St. Francis Medical Group Spine Specialists.

He joins Dan Nordmann, M.D., and Erika Cottrell, M.D., in practice at 8051 S. Emerson Ave., Suite 360., located on the St. Francis-Indianapolis campus.

Board-certified in both anesthesiology and pain management, he comes to St. Francis from Central Illinois Anesthesia. He is the former chief of the Department of Anesthesia and Pain at Riverside Tappahannock Hospital (Virginia) and at St. Anthony’s cialis in Effingham, Ill.

Prince, who has published in medical journals and lectured internationally about spine treatment, has held various appointments with professional organizations. In Maryland, he was commissioned by the governor to a physician practice study commission and served on a professional ethics committee for the Medical and Chirological Society.

A recipient of numerous academic awards, Prince completed an anesthesia residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He earned his medical degree at Milton S. Hershey College of Medicine and received bachelor degrees in natural science and mathematics at Johns Hopkins.

St. Francis Medical Group Spine Specialists diagnose and treat the causes of symptoms of spine-related pain.

To learn more or to make an appointment, call 317-783-8494.

To learn more about St. Francis Medical Group, visit www.stfrancisdoctors.org.


Diet Menu Program Herbalife Fasting Month
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Alhamdulillah I felt a moment fasting month. Many are already starting to ask, how can I consume Herbalife at Ramadan? I can actually do?

Aja ya can! Next Herbalife diet program guide in the fasting month!

Sahur

Decrease Weight

* 1 cup water + aloe & cheap cialis, shake with 3 tbsp NPDM
* Fresh fruit & vegetable stew
* 3 & glass Thermo NRG

Stamina

* 1 cup water + aloe & cheap cialis, shake with 3 tbsp NPDM, eating normal
* Closed with fresh fruit
* 3 & glass Thermo NRG

Adding Weight

* Eat normally closed with fresh fruit & pudding
* 1 cup Aloe & tablets, shake with 3 tbsp NPDM
* 3 & glass Thermo NRG

Buka Puasa

Decrease Weight

* NRG & Thermo slightly (honey can be added / fruit juice)
* Tablet + Shake normal

Stamina

* NRG & Thermo slightly (honey can be added / fruit juice)
* Tablet + Shake normal

Adding Weight

* NRG & Thermo slightly (honey can be added / fruit juice)
* Eat fast open
* Tablet + Shake normal

After the Sunset prayer, Isya & Tarawih

Decrease Weight

* Night and Day tablet half portion of dinner
* Throughout the night drinking water and white 8 - 12 glasses
* Before bed 1 cup water + 3 white cap herbal aloe

Stamina

* Night and Day tablet normal dinner
* Throughout the night drinking water and white 8 - 12 glasses
* Before bed 1 cup water + 3 white cap herbal aloe

Adding weight

* Night and Day tablet normal dinner
* Throughout the night drinking water and white 8 - 12 glasses
* Before bed 1 cup water + 3 white cap herbal aloe

If you want to print this image may also:) Congratulations fast!
program-fast-Herbalife

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